HomeVideosTreatmentProjectsFriends
Site Wide RSS Feed


Home
STEM CELL TREATMENTS AVAILABLE TODAY
 
QUICK FIND ARTICLES ON YOUR MEDICAL CONDITION OR AREA OF INTEREST
 

The Don Margolis Blog

Featuring the most comprehensive collection of "disease specific" stem cell treatment articles in the world. We provide the most current, factual and comprehensive information on available stem cell treatments today for your specific medical condition.

NEED STEM CELL INFO RELEVANT TO YOU?
Go to the MEDICAL CONDITION column to the left to search our extensive database of stem cell treatment articles.

----------

I'M READY FOR TREATMENT!
  • Go to TREATMENT INFORMATION and fill out the medical form to receive personalized information on stem cell treatments for your specific condition.

I WANT THE LATEST STEM CELL TREATMENT INFORMATION!
  • Go to NEWSLETTER SIGN UP to receive regular updates on stem cell treatments for multiple diseases.

WHO IS DON MARGOLIS?

----------

Still can't find what you're looking for?
For more specific searches, use the search bar at the top right or contact a patient coordinator at: 214-556-6377

Are you or a loved one interested in receiving stem cell treatment? For free information, please fill out our treatment form or email me don@repairstemcells.org and just put TREATMENT in the subject box and the MEDICAL CONDITION in the message.
During the Second International Adult Stem Cell conference at the Vatican, a boy who had his windpipe replaced with one grown using his own stem cells won the “Pontifical Hero Award” for his courage. Ciaran Finn-Lynch, 14, was born with long-segment tracheal stenosis, a condition that resulted in a narrow windpipe and made it hard for him to breathe. The operation involved taking a donor trachea and seeding it with stem cells taken from Ciaran’s bone marrow.  The result of the procedure was that after six months, his trachea looked almost normal. Further more, the operation used his own cells, preventing the need for anti-rejection drugs.

Ciaran Finn Lynch and his mom and dad pose with his Pontifical Hero Award on April 12, 2013 in Vatican City. Credit: Stephen Driscoll/CNA.

Vatican Honors Boy for Courage During Stem Cell Trachea Transplant Operation that Used His Own Cells

During the Second International Adult Stem Cell conference at the Vatican, a boy who had his windpipe replaced with one grown using his own stem cells won the “Pontifical Hero Award” for his courage.

Ciaran Finn-Lynch, 14, was the second person to receive the award, and he made the trip from Northern Ireland to the Vatican to receive it.

“Ciaran is a shining example of what this result has shown,” said his father, Paul Finn, in an April 12 interview with CNA.

His mother, Colleen Finn, said “we need to have faith in God to get through all of this.”

“This has made our faith stronger because we need more and more prayers all the time,” she added.

Ciaran was born with long-segment tracheal stenosis, a condition that resulted in a narrow windpipe and made it hard for him to breathe.

He had a major transplant surgery to rebuild his trachea when he was two years-old.

Doctors placed metal stents to hold his windpipe open and he went without any major issues until he was 10 years-old.

One day after school, the stents that had been placed in his windpipe started to cut into his aorta, the main blood vessel coming out of his heart.

He was taken to intensive care at Belfast Hospital and then later transferred to London’s Great Ormond Children’s Hospital.

“He had several operations but he had more bleeding from his stents,” said Doctor Paolo De Coppi, head of the surgery unit at University College London’s Institute of Child Health, during the April 12 morning session of the conference.

“The leader of our team didn’t know what to do next, but an option was to do an operation done before on an adult in Barcelona. But we didn’t have the time to do that,” De Coppi explained.

“But we did something similar and it was a quite difficult operation,” he said.

The operation involved taking a donor trachea and seeding it with stem cells taken from Ciaran’s bone marrow.

The result of the procedure was that after six months, his trachea looked almost normal.

“Ciaran is doing really well and I think he has a chance to become a rock star, since he plays the drums so well,” De Coppi commented after showing a video of Ciaran playing with a band.

Ciaran told CNA that it felt good to receive the award and that he was happy with his life.

His father noted that the stem cells “have been a great contribution to Ciaran’s procedure.”

“What we’ve heard here these last couple of days (at the conference) has been amazing, knowing they’re talking about building other organs,” Paul Finn said.

Ciaran’s mother noted that she was happy that her son is not on any medication, since the operation used his own cells, preventing the need for anti-rejection drugs.

“You just have to keep going on for him, and you can’t show that you’re scared or teary and you just have to put a brave face on,” said Colleen.via
Posted: 4/21/2015 8:58:29 AM by CJ Simpson | with 0 comments


Are you or a loved one interested in receiving stem cell treatment? For free information, please fill out our treatment form or email me don@repairstemcells.org and just put TREATMENT in the subject box and the MEDICAL CONDITION in the message.
UCLA researchers report a major breakthrough using adult stem cells to treat Parkinson’s disease. A parkinson patient was treated with his own adult stem cells into only half of his brain, no chance of transplant rejection, no tumors. The patient’s motor skills improved by over 80 percent in the first five years after the procedure, he was able to have an active lifestyle. 

Parkinson's: Adult Stem-Cell Use Proves Successful Once Again!

LifeNews.com reports the results were published in the February issue of the Bentham Open Stem Cell Journal. Dr. David Prentice, a fellow with the Family Research Council, says the research features only one patient.

“The gentleman was treated with stem cells into only half of his brain, and he went almost five years (without symptoms),” he explains. “Now his symptoms did start to return after that, and obviously he’d like the other half of his brain treated.”

The patient’s motor skills improved by over 80 percent in the first five years after the procedure. Prentice says he was able to have an active lifestyle. “During that time he was traveling all around the world and living a full life,” he points out.

David Prentice (FRC)No human embryos were killed in the research. “They used the gentleman’s own adult stem cells, so obviously there’s no chance of transplant rejection, no tumors,” Prentice notes, “and of course, adult stem cells really work in patients.”

UCLA researchers will now expand their work to 15 humans.via
Posted: 4/20/2015 7:24:33 PM by CJ Simpson | with 0 comments


Are you or a loved one interested in receiving stem cell treatment? For free information, please fill out our treatment form or email me don@repairstemcells.org and just put TREATMENT in the subject box and the MEDICAL CONDITION in the message.

Revolutionary findings in study by researchers in Korea suggest the first real breakthrough toward preventing Alzheimer's and helping millions of patients and families by relieving its symptoms. Researchers announced this week the results of a study that suggests an astounding possibility: adult stem cells may not only have a positive effect on those suffering from Alzheimer's disease, they can prevent the disease. Using fat-derived adult stem cells from humans, adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells, researchers were able to cause Alzheimer's disease brains in animal models to regenerate.  For the first time in history, stem cells were used to identify the mechanism that is key to the treatment of Alzheimer's disease, and demonstrated how to achieve efficacy as well as prevention of the symptoms of Alzheimer's with adult stem cells, a "holy grail" of biomedical scientists for decades.

Study Shows Stem Cells May Prevent And Cure Alzheimer's

In the first study of its kind, researchers at Korea's leading university and the RNL Bio Stem Cell Technology Institute announced this week the results of a study that suggests an astounding possibility: adult stem cells may not only have a positive effect on those suffering from Alzheimer's disease, they can prevent the disease. Using fat-derived adult stem cells from humans [scientific term: adMSCs, or human, adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells], researchers were able to cause Alzheimer's disease brains in animal models to regenerate.  The researchers, for the first time in history, used stem cells to identify the mechanism that is key to treatment of Alzheimer's disease, and demonstrated how to achieve efficacy as well as prevention of the symptoms of Alzheimer's with adult stem cells, a "holy grail" of biomedical scientists for decades.

Alzheimer's disease, the most common form of dementia (loss of brain function), is the 6th leading cause of death, and affects 1 in 8 people -- more than breast cancer.  As of 2010, there were 35.6 million people with Alzheimer's disease in the world, but this number is expected to double every 20 years.  It is estimated that the total cost of Alzheimer's is US $604 billion worldwide, with 70% of this cost  in the US and Europe.  To put that in perspective, Alzheimer's care costs more than the revenues of Wal-Mart (US$414 billion) and Exxon Mobil (US$311 billion), according to the British World Alzheimer's Report of ADI.  The cost of Alzheimer's is at the top of health economists' list of the disorders of aging that could topple nations' entire economies, and that regularly ruin not only the lives of patients but of their relatives.  

According to the results of this first major study, Alzheimer's may soon be a preventable disease, or even a thing of the past.  Equally important, the safety human administration of the kind of adult stem cells used in this experiment has been established in multiple articles and government-approved clinical trials.  

THE RESEARCH:

The study was jointly led by Seoul National University Professor Yoo-Hun Suh and RNL Bio Stem Cell Technology Institute (SCTI) director Dr. Jeong-Chan Ra.  

The researchers and their teams injected stem cells into mice genetically designed to have the core symptoms and physiology of Alzheimer's disease.  They were able to identify that these human stem cells, derived from adipose tissue, behave in a very special way when injected into the tail vein of mice subjects.  The cells migrated through the blood brain barrier, thought by many to be impossible for adult stem cells to cross, and went into the brain. In fact, fluorescent labeled cells were monitored for distribution in subjects and the team identified that the infused cells migrated throughout the bodies including brain except the olfactory organ, and therefore confirmed that IV infused stem cell can reach to the brain across the blood brain barrier. 

The team infused human adipose stem cells intravenously in Alzheimer model mice multiple times two weeks apart from three month to 10 month. Once there, the mice who received cells improved in every relevant way: ability to learn, ability to remember, and neuropathological signs.  More important, for the first time ever, Alzheimer model mice showed the mediation of IL-10, which is known for anti-inflammation and neurological protection.  

The team also found that stem cell restored special learning ability from Alzheimer model subjects with great reduction of neuropathy lesions. This was found using tests used for Alzheimer's disease: behavioral assessment.  In assessment it was found, amazingly, that stem cells' therapeutic effect on Alzheimer's disease was tremendous.  This was also found in pathological analysis.  The key though was prevention:  the scientists showed that stem cells, when infused into Alzheimer's mice, decreased beta amyloid and APP-CT, known to cause brain cell destruction, leading to dementia and Alzheimer's disease.  In the lab it was clear that stem cells increased neprilysin, which hydrolyzes toxic proteins.  No other compound or treatment has ever suggested so strongly the potential to prevent, as well as stop, this epidemic of incurable dementia sweeping across suffering patients and their families.  

Stopping Alzheimer's disease, let alone preventing it, is the focus of thousands of researchers worldwide.  Speaking of their breakthrough discovery, Professor Yoo-Hun Suh, who led the study, said, "It is a ground breaking discovery that such a simple method as IV injection of the safest autologous adipose stem cells, without causing any immune rejection, or any ethical issues, opened a new door to conquering Alzheimer's disease, one of the most horrible, expensive and incurable diseases of our time."  Joining him, leader of the RNL Bio Stem Cell Technology Institute Dr. Jeong-Chan Ra said, "It has never been more clear that it is an ethical imperative for governments to provide patients with incurable diseases with their right to participate not only in studies like this but in therapies with such obvious potential, once they have been tested as many times for safety as has our technology."  Both scientists stressed that the real breakthrough in their complex research is the prevention of the onset of symptoms.

Specifically, stem cells grafted in the brain, in another part of the study, were identified to induce cell division and neuro differentiation of endogenous neuro progenitor cells around the hippocampus and its surrounding cells and increase in great deal the stability of dendrites and synapses. Stem cell also contributed various anti-inflammatory and neuro growth factors, especially increased the expression of IL-10.  This again suppressed apoptosis of brain neurons, the prevention effect against Alzheimer's disease.

Dr. Ra of RNL Bio noted that, "RNL Bio has already completed government-approved clinical trials confirming the efficacy of RNL Bio stem cells in the management and treatment of other diseases, including osteoarthritis, limb ischemia, and progressive hemifacial atrophy (Romberg's disease)."

This study was published in a recent volume of the renowned, peer-reviewed U.S. medical journal PLOS ONE.  Images, plans for future efforts, and impact on this crushing disease will be discussed when the scientists discuss the details of this revolutionary study in a press conference in Seoul on September 27th.via

 

SOURCE RNL BIO CO., LTD.

 
Posted: 4/19/2015 7:23:24 AM by CJ Simpson | with 0 comments


Are you or a loved one interested in receiving stem cell treatment? For free information, please fill out our treatment form or email me don@repairstemcells.org and just put TREATMENT in the subject box and the MEDICAL CONDITION in the message.
Type 2 diabetes and its complications are considered to have an underlying immunological component associated with excessive pro-inflammatory cytokines. The immunomodulatory properties of Mesoblast’s Mesenchymal Precursor Cells (MPCs) provided the rationale for conducting the study.The study investigators concluded there was sufficient evidence to support further evaluation into the use of MPCs in type 2 diabetes and its complications, and to explore further the effects of MPCs on disease mechanisms.

Type 2 Diabetes Trial Using Mesoblast’s Proprietary Adult Stem Cells Yields Positive Results

MELBOURNE, Australia, June 18, 2014 – Results from the Phase 2 trial of Mesoblast’s proprietary adult stem cells in type 2 diabetes patients have been presented at the scientific sessions of the American Diabetes Association annual meeting.

3413-ClinicalTrialImageLogo.jpg

Type 2 diabetes and its complications are considered to have an underlying immunological component associated with excessive pro-inflammatory cytokines.

The immunomodulatory properties of Mesoblast’s Mesenchymal Precursor Cells (MPCs) provided the rationale for conducting the study.

The Phase 2 randomized, single-blind, placebo-controlled, dose escalation trial was conducted across 18 U.S. sites. The trial evaluated the effects of a single intravenous infusion of 0.3, 1.0 or 2.0 million MPCs/kg or placebo over 12 weeks in 61 patients who were inadequately controlled on metformin alone or with one other glucose-lowering agent. Mean diabetes duration was 10 years.


The key findings from the study:
 
  • There were no safety issues and the cell infusions were well tolerated (with a maximal dose of 246 million cells).
  • There was a dose-dependent improvement in glycemic control as evidenced by a decrease at all timepoints after week 1 in hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) in MPC-treated patients compared with an increase in HbA1c in placebo treated subjects.
  • A significant reduction in HbA1c was seen after 8 weeks in the 2 M/kg MPC group compared to placebo (p less than 0.05) which was sustained through 12 weeks.
  • The reduction in HbA1c was most pronounced in subjects with baseline HbA1c greater or equal to 8 percent (i.e. those patients with relatively poorer glucose control).
  • Fasting insulin levels were reduced in the 1M and 2M/kg groups compared to placebo (P less than 0.05).
  • Reduced levels of inflammatory cytokines TNF-alpha and IL-6 were observed at 12 weeks in MPC groups compared to placebo.
 
The study investigators concluded there was sufficient evidence to support further evaluation into the use of MPCs in type 2 diabetes and its complications, and to explore further the effects of MPCs on disease mechanisms.
 
Posted: 4/18/2015 7:22:45 PM by CJ Simpson | with 0 comments


Are you or a loved one interested in receiving stem cell treatment? For free information, please fill out our treatment form or email me don@repairstemcells.org and just put TREATMENT in the subject box and the MEDICAL CONDITION in the message.
It is the first large phase II international multicentre clinical trial to determine the safety of a consensus treatment protocol established by the International Mesenchymal Stem Cells Transplantation Study Group to obtain information on its effectiveness on multiple sclerosis patients. Promising results are that so far the treatment appears safe, without adverse side effects.

Multiple Sclerosis - Italians Lead Clinical Trial Testing Safety and Effectiveness of Stem Cell Transplantation MS Patients

(ANSA) – Boston, September 9 – Mesenchymal stem cell therapy to treat multiple sclerosis so far appears safe and without side effects, according to data released Tuesday and obtained through clinical trials on patients as part of the international Mesems project coordinated by University of Genoa neurologist Antonio Uccelli.

The results were announced ahead of the World Congress on Treatment and Research in Multiple Sclerosis opening in Boston Wednesday through Saturday. The Mesems project involves researchers from nine countries – Italy, Spain, France, Britain, Sweden, Denmark, Switzerland, Canada and Australia.

It is the first large phase II international multicentre clinical trial to determine the safety of a consensus treatment protocol established by the International Mesenchymal Stem Cells Transplantation Study Group to obtain information on its effectiveness on multiple sclerosis patients.

So far, 81 patients have been involved in the project – half of the 160 needed for the whole clinical trial. About 73 – or 90% of those involved in blind testing – were given at least one injection with mesenchymal therapy or got a placebo while 51 – or 63% – were given both injections and 27 – 33% – completed the study.

“The promising result is that so far none of these 27 people have suffered significant adverse events, which means that, so far, the treatment appears to be safe”, said Uccelli. The neurologist warned that “caution is necessary” and that the effectiveness of the therapy can only be determined once the study is completed in 2016.

Uccelli however added that preliminary studies on animals have persuaded researchers that mesenchymal stem cells “can halt inflammation on the central nervous system and probably succeed in protecting nervous tissue, even repairing it where damage is minor”. Out of the 81 patients recruited so far, “28 are Italian and 10 of them have completed the study”, Uccelli said, adding that all patients over the past year did relatively well except for one who was treated with placebo.

The neurologist expressed the hope that “data in 2016 will give final confirmation that the therapy is effective so we can take the subsequent step with a larger phase III study aimed at demonstrating the role of stem cells as neurorepairers”. Meanwhile Genoa’s bioethics committee has approved a two-year extension of the project, which will be called Mesems Plus, “to verify, beyond the year of observation provided for by Mesems, the long-term safety of treatments in the study and the potential insurgence of adverse events in all those treated”, said Uccelli.
Posted: 4/17/2015 7:22:08 PM by CJ Simpson | with 0 comments


Are you or a loved one interested in receiving stem cell treatment? For free information, please fill out our treatment form or email me don@repairstemcells.org and just put TREATMENT in the subject box and the MEDICAL CONDITION in the message.
In this Good Morning Texas segment, Dr. Bill Johnson explains how SVF Stem Cell Therapy can be used for Neuropathy, MS, ALS, knee replacement, and shoulder replacement. A full transcript of the conversation is listed below.

SVF Stem Cell Therapy For Neuropathy, MS, ALS, Knee Replacement, Shoulder Replacement



Full Transcript
 
HOST: Well, we often hear about stem cell therapy in the news and in magazines. We see this word used a lot. But what’s really happening to advance this type of therapy?
 
Well, Dr. Bill Johnson of Innovations Medical has just returned from a conference. He is here to tell us about some of the latest developments, and some of them are really exciting, Dr. J.
 
DR. J: Really some exciting things going on. We’re talking about using your own fat to get your own stem cells and then giving them back to you for therapeutic reasons – to fix things that we’ve not been able to fix in the past – and one of the really piece of the update is there’s more and more research showing that using cells that come from fat are effective in this. That’s important because probably the most common question we get is why we’re not using bone marrow cells.
 
HOST: Okay. Yeah, right.
 
DR. J: And the reason we don’t like bone marrow is fat’s easier to get and we can get much larger numbers. With bone marrow, you typically have to culture the cells to get enough to use, and when you do that, most people have to go outside the country to use them. When we use your fat, we don’t have to do that, we don’t have to culture them. And, with studies showing that it’s effective, we’re really feeling better and better about fat all the time.
 
HOST: Okay. This is actually a really huge advancement that you’re bringing to us today. So, once you have those stem cells from fat – not from bone marrow – how important is it how we use them?
 
DR. J: Well, the process of getting the cells out of the fat has become really standardized. We’re getting 50 to 100 million stem cells every time we do it. And so, it’s no longer a mystery, there’s no longer a lot of work going into how to get the cells. Where all the work is coming is how do we use the cells once we have them and this became more and more apparent that how we use them is critical in the response we get.
 
Just as an example, a year ago, when we first started, if someone came in with knee problems, needing knee replacement, we’re going to try and help them. We gave all the stem cells into the knee. Now, we give part of the stems cells into the knee and part of the stem cells in the vein because it’s been shown that, when we use both, we get a more consistent response, a more complete response. So, we’re learning more and more that how we deliver the cells is really critical in how well they work.
 
HOST: Okay. So, can patients do anything before the deployment to help out that response?
 
DR. J: Well, that’s a question that’s more and more coming up. How do we make the response better? And one of the really interesting things that’s come from that is that we need a little inflammation to really make this effective and we’ve got an animation here that shows why because, when we cut ourselves or cut our finger, what happens is the damaged cells release growth factors and the growth factors are what call the stem cells in and stimulate them to multiply and do the healing.
 
So, because of that, if, for instance, you have an arthritic joint and you’re on an anti-inflammatory, we now realize that we need to stop that a few days ahead of time so we’ve got a little inflammation area and that’s going to enhance the ability of the stem cells to work. We’re also starting to use some techniques like Acoustic Wave Therapy which we’ve used before for cellulite and other things. We can produce a little bit of inflammation with that and, again, producing that little bit of inflammation really enhances the ability of the stem cells to target where we’re going and then do what we want them to do when they get there.
 
HOST: Okay. So, you’re hopeful that this is going to help with so many different diseases. In fact, there’s been some good advancements that suggest ALS may benefit from it.
 
DR. J: Yeah, I think one of the very most exciting advancements is we now have a neurosurgeon out in California that’s placing a port that goes into the cerebral spinal fluid right around the brain. It’s an easy little out-patient procedure. Actually, it only takes about ten minutes to do. And that allows us to inject the stem cells directly into the fluid around the brain.
 
Right now, we’re doing it just as a target. By next year, we should be able to use this for patients with ALS. There’s some real hope for all these people that are getting there. The ice bucket challenge may really help to get some real hope for stem cell work on ALS. There’s some real good hope for multiple sclerosis Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease – a lot of these neurologic disorders that previously we’ve had very few ways of making a real difference.
 
HOST: Okay. This is just a year that you’ve been bringing this to GMT and these advancements are really exciting. So, obviously, one more year is going to yield hopefully even better results and better after-stories as well, right?
 
DR. J: We’re really, really excited about it, and with all these new changes, from now till the end of September, we’re going to go back to our introductory price. We’d let prices go up and we’re going to go back to our original price in September because we now know some more that we didn’t know a year ago.
 
HOST: That’s great. Dr. J, thanks for the update today.
Posted: 4/15/2015 7:20:55 PM by CJ Simpson | with 0 comments


Are you or a loved one interested in receiving stem cell treatment? For free information, please fill out our treatment form or email me don@repairstemcells.org and just put TREATMENT in the subject box and the MEDICAL CONDITION in the message.
Many have become familiarized with Lou Gehrig disease, also know as ALS (Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis), with the recent popularity of "The ALS Ice Bucket Challenge." Years before there was the Ice Bucket Challenge Israeli biotech company, BrainStorm, has been working in the background, developing a new and effective treatment untilizing adult stem cell therapy called NurOwn. The name, refers to the use of patient's own stem cells as the base of treatment. This first-of-its-kind technology essentially takes the patients' own mesenchymal stem cells from their bone marrow. In an interview, BrainStorm President, stated that the purpose of this therapy is to 'regenerate the cells that have not yet died, to keep the yet-healthy cells well, and hopefully to also regenerate the new, healthy cells, with the goal of stopping progression…if used immediately following diagnoses, it may stop all progression, and perhaps even cure the disease'.

Israel's ALS Research in Action

Many have only recently become familiarized with Lou Gehrig's disease, also know as ALS (Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis), with the recent popularity of "The ALS Ice Bucket Challenge," which has taken social media by storm, and succeeded in raising millions of dollars for research - specifically, a comprehensive study of the human genome to determine genetic factors in onset and progression of this degenerative disease. What you may not have heard, however, is that before there was the Ice Bucket Challenge to chill the spine, warm the heart, and open the wallet, Israeli biotech company, BrainStorm, has been tirelessly working in the background for years, developing a new and effective treatment for ALS (as well as other debilitating neurodegenerative diseases such as Multiple Sclerosis and Parkinson's disease) using adult stem cells, and the results will astound you!

According to the ALS Association, ALS is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that affects nerve cells in the brain and the spinal cord. Motor neurons reach from the brain to the spinal cord and from the spinal cord to the muscles throughout the body. The progressive degeneration of the motor neurons in ALS eventually leads to their death. When the motor neurons die, the ability of the brain to initiate and control muscle movement is lost. With voluntary muscle action progressively affected, patients in the later stages of the disease may become totally paralyzed.

The average life expectancy for those diagnosed with ALS is about two to five years.

Despite a limited number of medications to improve quality of life and delay deterioration from the disease, the average life expectancy for those diagnosed with ALS is about two to five years. This means that time is of the utmost essence for ALS patients from the time of diagnoses. And finally, hope is beginning to materialize in the research of BrainStorm, an Israeli biotechnology company that is the frontrunner of adult stem cell research.


At Hadassah Medical Center in Jerusalem, BrainStorm has developed an adult stem cell therapy called NurOwn. In this case, the secret truly does lie in the name, referring to the patient's own stem cells as the base of treatment. This first-of-its-kind technology essentially takes the patients' own mesenchymal stem cells from their bone marrow, and treats them with certain chemicals which cause them to multiply and become neuron-supporting cells.  These "upgraded" cells are then transplanted back into the patients near the site of damage, in the spine and/or muscles (depending on the disease). The newly implanted cells trigger nerve growth in the areas of implantation, promoting motor neuron growth, and the reestablishment of nerve muscle interaction. This innovative new method of using adult stem cells, completely bypasses all risk of cell rejection, as the implanted cells are, in fact, the patient's own; the treatment also masterfully absolves itself of all moral conflict involved in the much debated field of stem cell research and treatment, as the stem cells are adult stem cells derived from said patient.

This innovative new method of using adult stem cells, completely bypasses all risk of cell rejection


BrainStorm3-ALS-550.jpg
(photo credit: © BrainStorm Cell Therapeutics)



Clinical Trials in Israel declared a success

In 2014, BrainStorm successfully completed a Phase IIa dose-escalating trial with NurOwn in patients with ALS. The trial, which began in 2012, was overseen by Professor Dimitrios Karussis, a neurologist at Hadassah Medical Center.  This Phase was designed to evaluate the safety and preliminary efficiency of the treatment. The trial participants received combined intramuscular and intrathecal administration of NurOwn cells in three cohorts with increasing doses. They were followed for six months after transplantation.

From among patients given this therapy was Rabbi Rafael Shmulevitz, who had been given a prognosis of two to four years to live. By the time he began BrainStorm's treatment he had lost the ability to walk and speak clearly.  According to Karussis, “Within a few weeks following injection with NurOwn cells, the patient showed dramatic improvement in a variety of functions including breathing, speech, walking, muscular strength, and overall well-being.” Just six months following the treatment, Israelis watched the news in awe as Shmulevitz began speaking and walking once more.   Currently, as of most recent reports, Rabbi Shmulevitz is alive and well, with his most drastic improvement having taken place in the beginning of the treatment.

While Karussis was not quick to draw scientific conclusion based on one patient, he did find the results to be very encouraging. When asked in an interview with Channel 2 News if he thought this was a breakthrough that will lead to a cure for ALS, Karussis answered that while it was still soon to be making such general statements, he believed that "we are in the first stages of something new and revolutionary."  

"...we are in the first stages of something new and revolutionary."

Fast forward two years later to present day: BrainStorm has already received FDA approval for NurOwn to begin clinical trials in the United Stated. In June 2014 BrainStorm entered into a Memorandum of Understanding with the University of Massachusetts Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital to begin ALS human clinical trials at these institutions that consist of randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled multi-center studies to further determine the safety and efficiency of the treatment.

In an interview, BrainStorm President Chaim Lebovits, stated that the purpose of this therapy is to 'regenerate the cells that have not yet died, to keep the yet-healthy cells well, and hopefully to also regenerate the new, healthy cells, with the goal of stopping progression…if used immediately following diagnoses, it may stop all progression, and perhaps even cure the disease'. The outlook is bright for the future of the adult stem cell research field, and could very well mean a revolution in the way we treat disease in the not-so-distant-and-ever-approaching-future.



Adult stem cell research could very well mean a revolution in the way we begin to treat disease.



Posted: 4/15/2015 7:18:46 PM by CJ Simpson | with 0 comments


Are you or a loved one interested in receiving stem cell treatment? For free information, please fill out our treatment form or email me don@repairstemcells.org and just put TREATMENT in the subject box and the MEDICAL CONDITION in the message.
Newswise Researchers at the University of California, in partnership with ViaCyte, Inc., a biotechnology firm specializing in regenerative medicine, have launched the first-ever human Phase I/II clinical trial of a stem cell-derived therapy for patients with Type 1 diabetes. By implanting specially encapsulated stem cell-derived cells under the skin of patients, its believed they will mature into pancreatic beta cells able to produce a continuous supply of needed insulin. The hope is that this approach will ultimately transform the way individuals with Type 1 diabetes manage their disease by providing an alternative source of insulin-producing cells, potentially freeing them from daily insulin injections or external pumps.

CLINICAL TRIAL TO TEST SAFETY OF STEM CELL-DERIVED THERAPY FOR TYPE 1 DIABETES
September 10, 2014
University of California, San Diego Health Sciences

The trial will assess the safety and efficacy of a new investigational drug called VC-01, which was recently approved for testing by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The 2-year trial will involve four to six testing sites, the first being at UC San Diego, and will recruit approximately 40 study participants.

The goal, first and foremost, of this unprecedented human trial is to evaluate the safety, tolerability and efficacy of various doses of VC-01 among patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus, said principal investigator Robert R. Henry, MD, professor of medicine in the Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism at UC San Diego and chief of the Section of Endocrinology, Metabolism & Diabetes at the Veterans Affairs San Diego Healthcare System. We will be implanting specially encapsulated stem cell-derived cells under the skin of patients where its believed they will mature into pancreatic beta cells able to produce a continuous supply of needed insulin. Previous tests in animals showed promising results. We now need to determine that this approach is safe in people.

Development and testing of VC-01 is funded, in part, by the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine, the states stem cell agency, the UC San Diego Sanford Stem Cell Clinical Center and JDRF, the leading research and advocacy organization funding type 1 diabetes research.

Type 1 diabetes mellitus is a life-threatening chronic condition in which the pancreas produces little or no insulin, a hormone needed to allow glucose to enter cells to produce energy. It is typically diagnosed during childhood or adolescence, though it can also begin in adults. Though far less common than Type 2 diabetes, which occurs when the body becomes resistant to insulin, Type 1 may affect up to 3 million Americans, according to the JDRF. Among Americans age 20 and younger, prevalence rose 23 percent between 2000 and 2009 and continues to rise. Currently, there is no cure. Standard treatment involves daily injections of insulin and rigorous management of diet and lifestyle.

Phase I/II clinical trials are designed to assess basic safety and efficacy of therapies never before tested in humans, uncovering unforeseen risks or complications. Unpredictable outcomes are possible. Such testing is essential to ensure that the new therapy is developed responsibly with appropriate management of risks that all medical treatments may present.

This is not yet a cure for diabetes, said Henry. The hope, nonetheless, is that this approach will ultimately transform the way individuals with Type 1 diabetes manage their disease by providing an alternative source of insulin-producing cells, potentially freeing them from daily insulin injections or external pumps.

This clinical trial at UC San Diego Health System was launched and supported by the UC San Diego Sanford Stem Cell Clinical Center. The Center was recently created to advance leading-edge stem cell medicine and science, protect and counsel patients, and accelerate innovative stem cell research into patient diagnostics and therapy.via 

Would Stem Cells Be Right For Me?
Posted: 4/15/2015 6:05:24 PM by CJ Simpson | with 0 comments


Are you or a loved one interested in receiving stem cell treatment? For free information, please fill out our treatment form or email me don@repairstemcells.org and just put TREATMENT in the subject box and the MEDICAL CONDITION in the message.
Through adult stem cell treatment patients with Multiple Sclerosis are getting their lives back. When it comes to making a difference in people’s lives, adult stem cells are ethically far superior in practice to stem cells taken from embryonic human beings. And by using the patient’s own cells, you’ve precluded transplant rejection. Moreover, unlike embryonic stem cells, adult stem cells carry no concern of tumors. 

Great that treatment utilizing adult stem cells for patients suffering from degenerating diseases is happening, furthermore it is wonderful to see positive media coverage. The only problem is the reference to the success of this treatment as 'miraculous'. The benefits of stem cell therapy are not miraculous as they are happening everyday all over the world. - RCSI

Am I a candidate for stem cell treatment for Multiple Sclerosis?
 

Pioneering use of adult stem cells is making huge improvement in the condition of MS patients

By Dave Andrusko

Recovery: MS sufferer Holly Drewery became wheelchair-bound after the birth of daughter Isla, but thanks to the stem cell transplant she can dance, run and chase after Isla in the park

Recovery: MS sufferer Holly Drewery became wheelchair-bound after the birth of daughter Isla, but thanks to the stem cell transplant she can dance, run and chase after Isla in the park

If we’ve written once about the successful uses of adult stem cells, we’ve probably written 50 times, demonstrating that ethically unobjectionable adult stem cells are far superior in practice to stem cells taken from embryonic human beings.

When it comes to making a difference in people’s lives, adult stem cells– isolated from many different tissues, including bone marrow, blood, muscle, fat, and umbilical cord blood–are the gold standard.

The latest evidence comes courtesy of a story in the Daily Mail. In typical Daily Mail fashion the headline is anything but understated: “Dancing, walking and running again, the wheelchair-bound MS patients after they were given ‘miraculous’ stem cell treatment.”

But while the headline over Fiona Macrae’s story seems a bit overstated, her story quietly demonstrates that real progress is being made in treating multiple sclerosis, a devastating disease. I asked David Prentice, an expert on stem cells of all kinds, what he thought of the study, lead by Professor Basil Sharrack, of the Royal Hallamshire Hospital in Sheffield. He told NRL News Today

This is another gratifying example of the successful application of adult stem cells. Prof. Sharrack and colleagues are to be congratulated for undertaking this study, which has shown extremely promising results. Their publication of the data in the Journal of the American Medical Association adds even more evidence to the already-substantial successes for adult stem cell treatments for patients. The protocol they use, pioneered by Dr. Richard Burt at Northwestern University (who is also a co-author on the JAMA paper), involves harvest and purification of some of the patient’s bone marrow adult stem cells, then chemotherapy to kill the rogue immune cells that are causing the autoimmune problem of multiple sclerosis, followed by re-infusion of the patient’s adult stem cells. The patient’s adult stem cells “reboot” their immune and blood system, and also seem to facilitate some repair of the nervous system.

There are also two hurtles that are bypassed. By using the patient’s own cells, you’ve precluded transplant rejection. Moreover, unlike embryonic stem cells, adult stem cells carry no concern of tumors.

Macrae’s story provides two encouraging examples.

Holly Drewery was plagued with numbness and blurred vision. She was diagnosed with MS. Her health grew worse, as Macrae writes.

She became wheelchair-bound after her health worsened on Isla’s [her daughter’s] birth. She needed help with basic tasks and couldn't’t even wiggle her toes.

Three weeks after the stem cell transplant she was able to walk out of hospital.

Now, more than 18 months on, she is almost back to normal. She has a part-time office job and, although she still gets tired, can dance, run and chase after Isla, two, in the park.

She said: ‘All I wanted to be able to do is take Isla out. It worked wonders. I am more or less back to normal.’

Another patient, Sam Ramsey, was paralyzed from the neck down by MS after she collapsed when out celebrating her 22nd birthday.

Nothing worked until the adult stem cell treatment. Now she can walk on crutches and can drive.

“This treatment has given me my life back,” she told the Sunday Times. “This is not a word I would use lightly but we have seen profound neurological improvements.”

Of course more follow-up must be done to ensure that the amazing progress is not short-lived. But toward the very end of the story comes this very encouraging secondary improvement:

As well as stopping the disease in its tracks the treatment, known as autologous haematopoietic stem cell transplantation, seems to heal damage that has already been done.via
 

Am I a candidate for stem cell treatment for Multiple Sclerosis?

 


Posted: 4/13/2015 5:13:23 PM by CJ Simpson | with 0 comments


Are you or a loved one interested in receiving stem cell treatment? For free information, please fill out our treatment form or email me don@repairstemcells.org and just put TREATMENT in the subject box and the MEDICAL CONDITION in the message.
At a Health Affairs panel Tuesday researchers spoke about the costs of false-positive mammograms and breast cancer over diagnoses in the U.S.  Researchers believe by applying the false-positive rate of 11%, nearly 3.2 million women would receive false positive mammograms each year, at a cost of $2.8 billion annually. For years, a DCIS finding automatically led to bilateral mastectomy. However, providers now realize that it often does not progress and sometimes is actually not even cancerous.These false-positive screenings expose patients to additional diagnostic workup and psychological distress. 

MAMMOGRAPHY'S $4-BILLION PROBLEM

Millions of women receive false-positive results annually, and 20,000 are over treated.

by Shannon Firth 
Contributing Writer


WASHINGTON -- For too many women, breast cancer screening does more harm than good, a researcher said here.

Kenneth Mandl, PhD, a professor at Harvard Medical School and director of the Boston Children's Hospital Informatics Program, and Mei-Sing Long, PhD, a research fellow at the hospital, examined the costs of false-positive mammograms and breast cancer overdiagnoses in the U.S. Mandl spoke at a Health Affairs panel about the cost and quality of cancer care Tuesday.

 

"There's a $4-billion problem, and it's $4 billion dollars being spent on two undesirable outcomes," he said, referring to false-positive results and overtreatment of breast cancer.

 

The magnitude of the financial problem will likely grab policymakers' attention first, but what's important is the human cost, he said.

 

"There are many women who are brave enough to face a false-positive thinking they that they are ultimately protecting themselves from cancer, and it's a small price to pay. The calculus changes if the protection from cancer is very small," Mandl told MedPage Today.

 

Providers, patients, and their families need to have a clear understanding of the facts around mammography screening, including "the magnitude of the benefit and the likelihood of the harm," he said.

 

Mandl and Ong obtained cost data from a major healthcare insurance carrier covering some 700,000 women 40 to 59 years old, who had undergone routine mammograms from 2011 to 2013. The data included demographic characteristics as well as all their medical claims.

 

The researchers excluded women receiving mammography for diagnostic reasons, those who had been screened within 9 months prior to the index screen, and women with a high risk of breast cancer, "since they may have been undergoing surveillance mammography instead of routine screening," the report noted.

 

Mandl and Ong defined a false-positive mammogram as a screening test that is later revealed not to be cancer, yet "exposes patients to additional diagnostic workup and psychological distress."

 

They define overdiagnosis as identifying lesions that are "unlikely to become clinically evident during the lifetime of a patient [that ] exposes patients to the harm of overtreatment." Amounts the insurance company paid to healthcare providers for patients' services, excluding copayments, coinsurance, and deductibles, were totaled to reflect costs of diagnosis and treatment.

 

False-positive findings were returned in 11% of the routine screening mammograms included in the analysis.

 

In the U.S., with 21.2 million women ages 40 to 49 and another 22.4 million 50 to 59, and with screening rates of about 62% and 73%, respectively, the researchers estimated that about 29.5 million women in these age groups received mammograms in a year. Using the false-positive rate of 11%, they calculated that nearly 3.2 million women would receive false positive mammograms each year, at a cost of $2.8 billion annually.

 

The researchers also calculated that in the 40-to-59 age group there would be 114,298 screen-detected cancers, of which about one-fifth would be ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and the rest invasive tumors. Citing an overdiagnosis rate of 22%, based on recent studies, the researchers calculated that 20,116 women would be overdiagnosed with invasive breast cancer, at a cost of $1 billion each year. (Mandl and Ong were unable to determine which breast cancers were overdiagnosed using the claims data. "Thus we applied published overdiagnosis rates to determine the number of women who were likely to have been overdiagnosed," they noted in their report.)

 

"Here, we're talking about someone who's asymptomatic, not concerned about why they're sick, and not looking for a diagnosis," said Mandl.

 

The rate of overdiagnosis for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is a shocking 86%, according to the largest most recent study. For years, a DCIS finding automatically led to bilateral mastectomy, Mandl said. However, providers now realize that it often does not progress and sometimes is actually not even cancerous.

 

Mandl and Ong estimated the cost of DCIS overdiagnosis nationwide to be $243 million.

 

In total, they estimated costs of $1.2 billion in overdiagnoses for both invasive breast cancer and DCIS and another $2.8 billion for the workup and treatment costs associated with false positives.

 

Since 2009, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force has recommended breast cancer screening every other year, for women ages 50 to 74. For women under 50 years old, the Task Force notes, "The decision to start regular, biennial screening mammography before the age of 50 years should be an individual one and take patient context into account, including the patient's values regarding specific benefits and harms."

 

Ong and Mandl in their report's conclusion suggested that selective screening could benefit more patients than routine screening by age alone.

 

In selective screening, factors such as age, family history, genetic predisposition, breast density changes, and characteristics of mammography should help decide which women should receive screening, Mandl explained.

 

The idea is to limit screening to women for whom it clearly has a positive benefit-harm balance, although no specific algorithm for selective screening has been widely accepted.

 

In their Health Affairs paper, the researchers also noted that more research is needed "to develop risk-based stratification models" to prevent overtreatment of correctly diagnosed cancers and DCIS.

 

As for the impact of their report, Mandl said he hopes it will contribute to an understanding of the economics and explain why the "status quo" of current practices is so firmly entrenched.

 

"Any change in recommendation will shift the revenue one way or another and that has to be an explicit part of the conversation," Mandl said.via


Are you a Candidate for Breast Cancer Treatment?


Posted: 4/13/2015 4:29:05 PM by CJ Simpson | with 0 comments


Displaying results 1-10 (of 707)
 |<  < 1 - 2 - 3 - 4 - 5 - 6 - 7 - 8 - 9 - 10  >  >| 

Treatment Information

CLICK HERE

To request information on NOW AVAILABLE stem cell treatments for the MEDICAL CONDITION you are interested in.

Newsletter Sign Up

CLICK HERE

To request the RSCI Newsletter on stem cell treatments and information.

Who is Don Margolis

CLICK HERE

To learn more about RSCI's founder Don Margolis

Tag Cloud

AdiCyte Adipose adult allogeneic ALS Alzheimer Alzheimer's Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Anemia Anti-Aging Arteries Artery Arthritis Asperger Asthma Ataxia Autism Autoimmune autologous Batten Disease Blood BONE Bone Fractures BRAIN Bronchiectasis Bypass CANCER Cancers cardiac cardiovascular cartilage cell Cells cerebral Cerebral Palsy chronic Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Cirrhosis Congestive Congestive Heart Failure COPD cord Coronary Cosmetic cp Crohn's cure Dementia diabetes Diabetes Type 1 Diabetes Type 2 Diabetic Diabetic Foot Donation Dr.Johnson Duchenne Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Dystrophy embryonic Emphysema Epilepsy evolution Facial Rejuvenation Failure fox Gastro Gehrig Gilbert Glucose Glycemic Graft Grow heal Heart hypertension Infantile Spasms Intestinal j Jewish K Kidney Leukemia Liposuction Liver Longevity Lou Gehrig Lung Lupus Lymphoma Marrow MDS Meningitis Mesems Mesenchymal Mesoblast michael Motor Neuron MPC MS Multiple Multiple Myeloma Multiple Sclerosis Muscular Muscular Dystrophy Myeloma Neuropathy Olivopontocerebellar Atrophy oprah optic Optic Nerve Optic Nerve Damage Optic Nerve Hypoplasia Osteoarthritis Osteonecrosis oz palsy Parkinson Patent Peripheral Artery Disease Peripheral Vascular Disease Precursor Pulmonary Fibrosis Pulmonary Hypertension reconstruct Regenerate Regeneration Renal Renal Failure Repair research Rheumatoid Arthritis Schumer sci science Sclerosis Septo-Optic Dysplasia Spasm Spectrum Disorder Spina Bifida Spinal Cord Spinal Muscular Atrophy stem Stem Cells Stemmys Stroke SVF TBI Teat Technology Tendonitis Thalassemia therapy Tissue Transplant treat Treatment Trial umbilical Vascular Diseases Vatican Ventricular Vessel
Bookmark this page to:Add to Twitter Add to Newsvine Add to MySpace Add to Link-a-Gogo Add to Multiply Add to MyAOL Add to Diigo Add to Yahoo Bookmarks Add to Yahoo MyWeb Add to Facebook Add to Mister Wong Add to Terchnorati Add to Segnalo Add to Digg Add to Google Bookmarks Add to Reddit Add to Faves Add to Blogmarks Add to StumbleUpon Add to Delicious