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Are you or a loved one interested in receiving stem cell treatment? For free information, please fill out our treatment form or email me don@repairstemcells.org and just put TREATMENT in the subject box and the MEDICAL CONDITION in the message.
Pro/Am ballroom dancer and orthodontist, Dr. Janet Vaughan, is once again slated to compete on the professional dance circuit with her current professional partner, Mr. Eddie Stutts (Professional 10-Dance World Champion) following a successful stem cell procedure on her knee in Central America..
 
From 2007-2009, Dr. Vaughan partnered with World Champion Tony Dovolani and competed extensively in the U.S., winning a National Reserve Pro/Am Rhythm title. Tony Dovolani is best known for his appearances on ABC's hit reality series, "Dancing with the Stars", and has teamed up with Chynna Phillips, Wendy Williams, Audrina Partridge, Kate Gosselin, Kathy Ireland, Susan Lucci, Jane Seymour and other celebrities on the show.
 
Dr. Vaughan and Mr. Stutts are slated to compete in the Heritage Classic Dancesport Championships in Asheville, North Carolina next month. This will be the first time Dr. Vaughan has been able to compete since 2010 when she sustained a dancing related knee injury.
 
Dr. Vaughan also suffered from chronic neck pain resulting from injuries sustained in a car crash twenty years ago. Her neck injury culminated in a natural fusion of the c5-c6 vertebrae, scoliosis and extreme pain when her neck slipped out of alignment.
 
In an attempt to repair her knee and get her dancing career back on track, Dr. Vaughan decided to undergo stem cell therapy. "I was basically removed from competitive dance work because I could not rise or squat without extreme pain. I had also resigned myself to enduring chronic neck pain from my past accident and painful hand joints due to generalized arthritis," said Dr. Vaughan.
 
Dr. Vaughan 's knee was treated with stem cells that were harvested from her own adipose (fat) tissue.
 
The fat tissue sample is collected via mini-liposuction, which is performed by a certified plastic surgeon under light, general anesthesia. Mesenchymal stem cells and T regulatory cells reside within this tissue.
 
Adipose-derived cells are then separated from the fat. This entire process is subjected to stringent quality control. Before they can be administered back into the patient, these adipose-derived stem cells are tested for quality, bacterial contamination (aerobic and anaerobic) and endotoxin.
 
The adipose-derived stem cells are administered by a highly-qualified physician into the affected joint(s) (intra-articular injection) and intravenously (IV).
 
"It's taken about 6 months but I am amazed at the results I've gotten with my knee. Even my neck is better. I used to spend almost $1,000 per month on a neuromuscular massage therapist but I haven't needed any neuromuscular massages for the past 6 months. I wasn't counting on that. Even my doctors say that the dense scar tissue in my neck has changed in texture from grizzly to smooth, supple tissue," exclaimed Dr. Vaughan.
 
She continued, "I just danced 6 hours in Houston preparing for the upcoming competition in Asheville and my knee isn't even sore."
 
Dr. Vaughan is planning to return for a follow-up treatment this summer.
Posted: 2/3/2012 4:36:10 PM by Guest Blogger | with 0 comments


Are you or a loved one interested in receiving stem cell treatment? For free information, please fill out our treatment form or email me don@repairstemcells.org and just put TREATMENT in the subject box and the MEDICAL CONDITION in the message.
Jarvis Green
Tim Heitman/US Presswire
Former NFL defensive lineman Jarvis Green said stem-cell therapy has changed his life.


Former NFL defensive lineman Jarvis Green's decision to have stem-cell therapy on a torn-up knee wasn't just about football. It was also about quality of life. And 15 months after the procedure, from both a football and life standpoint, he has a message for Peyton Manning:

Good days are ahead.

Fox Sports NFL insider and NFL Network contributor Jay Glazer reported last weekend that the Colts quarterback, who's had three neck surgeries in 2011, including a September spinal fusion, went across the Atlantic Ocean to have the stem-cell treatment Green had done in an attempt to expedite the healing process and alleviate the associated pain. After that, it was revealed that Terrell Owens recently went to Korea to have a similar procedure.

Can Manning expect the results Green says he's gotten? That's unclear. "The only thing controversial about it," said renowned orthopedic surgeon Dr. Neal ElAttrache, "is that it's never been shown to work." Dr. James Gladstone, chief of sports medicine at Mount Sinai, adds, "It may turn out in some circumstances that it's a really good thing. In others, it may have no effect."

For his part, Green swears the therapy worked. In 2009, his final year with the Patriots, Green had two knee surgeries. The first, which he was told was "just a scope," took him months to recover. The second, coming during the season, took a month of games off the calendar for him. After playing out the year with New England, he bolted for Denver.

At minicamp the following June, his knee worsened to the point where he said it was "bone-on-bone." In an effort to hide a brace and heavy bandaging, he wore sweatpants. He says he had a good few days of practice, but he knew something was wrong. And he searched for answers.

"After minicamp, I couldn't walk up and down stairs, I couldn't play tennis with my kids. Nothing," Green said.

Stem-cell therapy is what he found. He went to a doctor in Bloomington, Colo., keeping all this from the Broncos. The process had doctors extracting bone marrow from his hip and harvesting it for three weeks. That substance was then injected into Green's knee. Green was told to wear knee braces for the next 10 days.

Within two weeks, he said everything changed.

It wouldn't be enough to save his football career. But it did give him a chance. Green passed the team's grueling conditioning test in July, just weeks after having the procedure done, and got some pretty serious returns away from the game as well.

"The pain was gone," Green said, adding that he plans to go to Europe to have the therapy on other areas of his body ravaged by football. "It was a tremendous difference in the pain level, my range of motion. It was amazing. I rented a house in Denver with an elevator, just to get by, and said nothing to coaches, because I was worried about getting cut.

"Two weeks later, I'm swimming and biking in the mountains. ... I went to camp, didn't miss a day of practice, ran every day, beat everyone in sprints."

Green has no doubt on the effects of the stem-cell therapy. Conversely, in the medical community, there's plenty of doubt.

"I can't recommend it until I've seen reasonably well-done studies on it," said ElAttrache, who did Tom Brady's ACL surgery and has worked for a half-dozen pro sports franchises. "What I know about that one particular type of treatment is that it's safe. I just don't know how effective it is."

Gladstone said, "I wouldn't say it's controversial. It's experimental. The effects and benefits of it are not known yet. We don't know whether it's a bunch of nonsense or if it's highly effective."

He related it to the concept of Platelet Rich Plasma, or blood spinning, a practice that came under scrutiny because of the involvement of Anthony Gallea, the Canadian doctor who pleaded guilty to bringing unapproved drugs such as human growth hormone into the U.S. Gladstone said where the idea of blood spinning is to promote healing through the separation of white and red blood cells, the concept of stem-cell therapy is to enhance healing.

"You get cells that haven't differentiated and haven't moved into whatever they're going to become, and you hope they become bone or cartilage or tendons," he explained. "It settles into an area that's injured, and the hope is it develops into the type of cell needed to heal that injury."

When asked if going to Europe to have the procedure done was a sign of desperation, ElAttrache -- who emphasized that he did not know the specifics of the Colts quarterback's treatment, and suspected it could even have been the kind of plasma treatment Kobe Bryant, Tiger Woods and Rafael Nadal had overseas -- responded that he didn't think Manning was going out on a limb by making the trip. Rather, it was exhausting another option.

In fact, he says he could see why the plasma treatment would be tempting. "If someone tells you it's natural, and that it's not going to harm you or delay healing, it might be attractive for someone with a chronic issue like arthritis," said ElAttrache.

ElAttrache added he thinks Manning has a "reasonable shot" of being available later this year, whether the treatment is effective or not. The course of the spinal fusion, the doctor says, is relatively predictable and can be expected to be effective. It's the nerve regeneration, which would bring back the power in his right arm and hand, that is less predictable. On the low end, ElAttrache says, that part will take 3-4 months. More likely, it'll shelve Manning for 9-12 months, making training camp in 2012 a better bet than December.

But the bottom line here is that ElAttrache sees the stem-cell therapy Manning had as highly unlikely to steady that part of it. It may help the healing process, particularly with anti-inflammatory effects, but if the regeneration happens in time for Manning to come back this year, the doctor says, it's probably not because of that trip overseas.

Meanwhile, in Colorado and with his new construction company in North Dakota, Green says he's living a better life because of the treatments. And his belief is that this chain of events starting with this therapy is no coincidence.

"They're working miracles," said Green. "I'm gonna go overseas again, because it works. I'm not 100 percent, but I'm playing football with my son. Stem-cell therapy, it does work, and it could help so many players out there."

Manning, of course, hopes it works for him. How much could it? That seems to be very much up for debate.
Posted: 9/24/2011 2:29:07 PM by Guest Blogger | with 0 comments


Are you or a loved one interested in receiving stem cell treatment? For free information, please fill out our treatment form or email me don@repairstemcells.org and just put TREATMENT in the subject box and the MEDICAL CONDITION in the message.

Stem cell therapy goes to the dogs

 

A surgical team at Veterinary Specialty Center in Buffalo Grove removes fat from Doodle, a 9-year-old German Shepherd suffering from osteoarthritis and hip dysplasia. Stem cells will be derived from the fat and injected into the dog./Photo submitted by Veterinary Specialty Center

A surgical team at Veterinary Specialty Center in Buffalo Grove removes fat from Doodle, a 9-year-old German Shepherd suffering from osteoarthritis and hip dysplasia. Stem cells will be derived from the fat and injected into the dog. Photo submitted by Veterinary Specialty Center

Doodle was the first dog to receive the new one-day stem cell procedure in Illinois./Photo submitted by Veterinary Specialty Center

Things were getting bad for Doodle. Despite her youthful name, the 9-year-old German Shepherd was experiencing joint pain from bilateral hip dysplasia and osteoarthritis. She would get sore and tired from long weekend walks and started falling up the stairs.

Her owners, the Dahl family of Oak Brook, had tried different options before landing on animal stem cell regenerative therapy, a procedure that’s a hot topic in the veterinary world. Last week, Doodle received reportedly the first such one-day operation in Illinois at the Veterinary Specialty Center in Buffalo Grove.

The practice of using stem cells, derived from the animal’s fat, to treat joint problems could be discouraging for pet owners because of cost and timing. The animal used to have to go twice to a vet hospital: once for surgery to remove fat cells and once again for the injection of the stem cells into the inflamed joint.  The cost was around $2,700.

Leslie Dahl, Doodle’s owner and a veterinarian herself, didn’t want to go that route. She had tried anti-inflammatory medication, but Doodle’s stomach couldn’t handle it. She tried collagen injections, but they didn’t fully relieve Doodle of her pain. Plus, the animal already was difficult at the vet’s and she was concerned that Doodle would get too anxious between the visits.

So when the Veterinary Specialty Center started looking into a new procedure that allows the stem cells to be processed in the same facility on the same day for about $1,900, Dahl was intrigued.

The process is essentially the same. Fat is removed and then processed by being put in a centrifuge and spun until the stoma stem cells are separated. They are then isolated, activated and injected back into the animal.

In the clinic before a lab was established, the cells were shipped to California, said Mitch Robbins, a surgeon at the Veterinary Specialty Center. The pet would be under anesthesia for removal of the cells, then a second time for the re-injection.

Doodle’s operation, and that of another dog called Fergus, were the center’s firsts in which the stem cells were processed in house, Robbins said.

He said he’s seen about 70 to 80 percent of the animals improve significantly with the treatment that’ s been available since about 2005.

“It’s been around for a little while,” said Kimberly May, a veterinarian and assistant director of professional and public affairs for the Schaumburg-based American Veterinary Medical Association. “We’ve actually been using it in horses for quite a while; now it’s being promoted for joint disease and hip dysphasia. It’s definitely growing, especially for pet owners who are hearing all these anecdotal stories.”

Research is progressing on the treatment’s effectiveness, May said.

“You find out what it really works for and where it doesn’t work,” she said. “We’re still in that stage with the stem cell procedures.”

Robbins said success depends on the animal’s ailments. Pets that don’t respond may be experiencing pain from a source other than  inflammation of the tissues around the joint.

“Some dogs do better, some do worse, some don’t respond at all,” he said.

On average, the animals he treats get re-injected every 18 months, he said. The cells can be stored, with subsequent procedures costing about $600.

Robbins believes the one-day procedure and lower cost will encourage more pet owners to help out their older dogs with arthritis or inflammatory problems. Dahl said her family would have had to euthanize Doodle if pain prevented her from moving, but that would have been a really tough decision since they embrace the dog’s quirky personality.

So far, Doodle’s recovery has been going well. It takes about 10 days to heal from the initial surgery and about four to five weeks to see results.

Doodle is still throwing balls to herself and performing stuffed animal tricks, but is not quite back to going up and down stairs.

“I don’t expect this is going to be a magic bullet to give her back her youth,” Dahl said. “But to get her where she’s not falling and she’s not in pain after going for just a moderate walk, that’s quality of life.

Stem cell therapy goes to the dogs — Buffalo Grove news, photos and events — TribLocal.com.

Posted: 4/7/2011 9:39:28 AM by Guest Blogger | with 0 comments


Are you or a loved one interested in receiving stem cell treatment? For free information, please fill out our treatment form or email me don@repairstemcells.org and just put TREATMENT in the subject box and the MEDICAL CONDITION in the message.
Menstrual blood stem cell banking being launched in India
March 2011 – 12:24pm India News
 

http://1800recycling.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/11/Eco-Friendly-Feminine-Products.jpg

New Delhi : Menstrual blood stem cells can now be easily collected, processed and harvested in an affordable, painless and non-invasive manner.

This unique stem cell banking is being launched in India for the first time at Chennai, capital of Tamil Nadu state, as LifeCell Femme menstrual blood stem cell banking service.

Until now, menstrual blood was discarded as unsanitary waste. Menstrual blood contains a large number of self-renewing stem cells that multiply rapidly and can differentiate into many other types of cells such as neural, cardiac, bone, fat, cartilage and possibly others, demonstrating great potential for cell therapy, statesman reported quoting the recent research.

Every month during a woman’s menstrual period the uterine lining, endometrium, is shed along with the extra blood and tissues. This lining of the uterus contains a large number of mesenchymal stem cells and several thousand fold high concentration of stem cell growth factors. These cells from the endometrium are unique because they have many properties and characteristics similar to both bone marrow and embryonic stem cells.

Although menstrual stem cell technology has not yet been utilised to date in human therapies, the collective body of ongoing research may potentially change the types of therapies used to diagnose or treat a host of significant medical conditions in the future affecting hundreds of millions worldwide like Alzheimer’s disease, atherosclerosis, diabetes, heart disease, inflammatory bowel disease, Parkinson’s disease, osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and many others.

“Stem cell technology is the future of medicine. Experiments performed at the Keio University school of medicine have succeeded in growing sheets of heart muscle from connective tissue cells harvested from menstrual blood When it comes to growing heart muscle, however, the connective tissue cells in menstrual blood have a success rate 100 times higher than the 0.2 – 0.3 percent for stem cells taken from human bone marrow,” said the chief scientific officer, LifeCell International, Dr Ajit Kumar.

Once collected the menstrual blood stem cells are dispatched to LifeCell’s state of the art laboratory facility at Chennai for processing. The stem cells are then harvested and the menstrual stem cells are frozen in liquid nitrogen storage container for cryogenic preservation at sub-zero minus 196 degrees centigrade. This procedure will enable the stem cells to retain their potency and viability for an indefinite period of time.

Menstrual blood stem cell banking being launched in India | TwoCircles.net.

How to Donate Menstrual Blood for Stem Cell Research

By an eHow Contributor

The use of menstrual blood as a resource for stem cells has been an interesting development in the field of bioresearch. The idea of collecting stem cells has been a controversial one at times. With this new method, there is no moral dilemma for anyone involved. In the future, people will benefit from the open availability of these types of stem cells. Currently, one company has the market cornered in the collection and storage of menstrual blood for stem cells. The company is called C’Elle. Collecting and storing your menstrual blood for its stem cells is easy.

Instructions-things you’ll need:

  • Collection package
    • 1

      Order your collection kit from C’Elle through their company website (see Resources).

    • 2

      Freeze the cooling packs that arrive with your C’Elle collection kit immediately upon arrival and continuously until you are ready to package your collections and send them back via FedEx.

    • 3

      To collect your menstrual blood, insert the provided menstrual cup in place of a tampon. This cup needs to be left in for three hours to collect your first of two specimens.

    • 4

      Take the menstrual cup out. It should have about a teaspoon of fluid in it. Carefully place this fluid into the provided vials of solution.

    • 5

      Refrigerate your first specimen while you collect your second.

    • 6

      Replace your menstrual cup for another three hours and repeat the collection process for your second vial. One vial will be used for storage and the other will be used for infectious disease testing.

    • 7

      Remove your cooling packs from the freezer; the first specimen from the refrigerator and package both specimens and the cooling packs in your original collection kit box after you have collected both specimens.

    • 8

      Ship your collection kit back to C’Elle using the provided airbilled FedEx box.

Read more: How to Donate Menstrual Blood for Stem Cell Research | eHow.comhttp://www.ehow.com/how_4587255_menstrual-blood-stem-cell-research.html#ixzz1Ia5iwhot

Posted: 4/6/2011 9:43:52 AM by Guest Blogger | with 0 comments


Are you or a loved one interested in receiving stem cell treatment? For free information, please fill out our treatment form or email me don@repairstemcells.org and just put TREATMENT in the subject box and the MEDICAL CONDITION in the message.

 

Technology is giving us many new inventions daily. One such recent invention of world class manufacturing technology has been made by Medivet Pty Ltd. The Research and Development Division of the company has introduced a new procedure with the help of which, the veterinarians can extract, process and activate an animal’s own adult stem cells by injecting them back again into the animal’s own body.
 
Medivet has recently introduced this unique procedure. Several countries worldwide and many international veterinarians today are using this procedure to treat many degenerative diseases such as primary and secondary arthritis, hip dysplasia, damaged or torn ligaments and tendons, joint pain, worn or damaged cartilage etc.

 

Medivet has spent many years and millions of dollars to introduce this one of the most exciting and valuable treatments ever released, exclusively for the veterinary field. The company is really making big with its American division, Medivet America LLC that is leading the field in sales and Adipose Stem Cell procedures.
 
Trials are still being conducted at many universities, in Australia and internationally. Also, thousands of Adipose Stem Cell Kits have been supplied to veterinarians enabling them to perform Stem cell procedures including the 14 international countries to which, Medivet is currently exporting the kits.
 

 

Posted: 4/5/2011 9:40:46 AM by Guest Blogger | with 0 comments


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