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Are you or a loved one interested in receiving stem cell treatment? For free information, please fill out our treatment form or email me don@repairstemcells.org and just put TREATMENT in the subject box and the MEDICAL CONDITION in the message.
By MoneyMorning.com.au
 
Occasionally we come across technology that’s not really technology in its truest sense. Sometimes, technology is really an assistant to nature. This is particularly evident in certain functions of the human body.
 
The human body has an amazing ability to repair and regenerate itself. You might be thinking right now, ‘no it doesn’t, we’re not salamanders.’ But believe me, there’s plenty in the body that can regenerate, though not in the sci-fi sense that many people think.
 
The terms ‘regrow’ and ‘regenerate’ often make people think of regrown limbs. Agreed, that’s not entirely possible…for now. But the body can regenerate thanks to ‘wonder-cells’ known as stem cells.
 
Although stem cells are naturally occurring, the latest technology is maximising their potential. Thanks to scientists and researchers we can do more now with stem cells than ever before.


It All Just Works Like Magic!
 
Stem cells can repair and regrow vital systems in our body. And encouragingly stem cells occur naturally in all of us. In fact the reason we are who we are is because while we’re embryos stem cells chop and change about to make all the bits that make us human.
 
Without getting too bogged down in the biology and science, there are effectively two types of stem cells. The first kind is embryonic stem cells, also known as pluripotent stem cells. These have the ability to become every type of cell in the body.
 
The second kind is adult stem cells, also known as multipotent stem cells. These have the ability to become only certain types of cells in the body.
 
These wonder-cells are vital to the future of regenerative medicine. That is the practice of medicine that repairs and regenerates the body. The potential lies in the ability to one day rewind the entire process of aging.
 
Stem cells are so important for a few key reasons. The Australian Stem Cell Foundation outlines these on their website,

‘Stem cells are different from other cells in the body in three main ways:
 
‘1. Stem cells are unspecialised. They have not developed into cells that perform a specific function.
 
‘2. Stem cells can differentiate. This means they can divide and produce cells that have the potential to become other more specific cell types, tissues or organs. These new cells and tissues are used to repair or replace damaged or diseased cells in the body. Once cells have differentiated, they have less capacity to form multiple different cell types, and become ‘committed’ to becoming a particular cell type. Skin stem cells, for example, give rise to new skin cells when needed, to assist regeneration after damage and as part of the normal ageing process.
 
‘3. Stem cells are capable of self-renewal. Stem cells are able to divide and produce copies of themselves which leads to self-renewal. Once a cell has become specialised (has differentiated) to a particular tissue or organ, it has a very limited capacity to self-renew (produce new stem cells) but instead produces only cells relevant to that organ.‘

Medical technology means scientists and researchers can use stems cells in a number of ways to cure disease and ailments like what I’m about to explain below. In what seems like a magical trick, scientists have even brought ‘dead’ organs back to life using stem cells.
 
And there’s growing evidence that stem cells hold even more potential than first thought.


The Human Element of These Amazing Cells
 
David Pyne is 60 years old. He lives in Manchester, England. He has four children and is a Grandfather. David got the worst news of his life in August 2012. He had leukaemia. He had about 12 to 18 months to live.
 
One way to treat leukaemia is to get a bone marrow transplant. However a global search resulted in no match for the required transplant. Time was running out and so were his options to stay alive.
Thankfully two babies were born. One in America, one in France. And even better was both mothers had decided to donate their umbilical cord blood.
 
This was so significant because one of the richest sources of stem cells is umbilical cord blood. It also just happened that these two donors were a good match for David.
 
With no other option the doctors treated him with the new stem cells. He spent six weeks in hospital hoping this would be the solution he so desperately needed.
 
As reported in The Mirror, the director of the hospital where David was treated said,

‘Umbilical cord blood is very rich in stem cells, which being so immature have phenomenal regenerative powers. These were a great alternative source of cells for David, in fact the only option, as after a worldwide search he had no other donor.‘

The stem cells worked, and David is now in remission. The regenerative powers of the stem cells have literally saved his life.
 
With more and more research every year, there’s seemingly endless potential in what stem cells are capable of treating. And in some cases stem cells might even improve parts of the body better than they were before.
 
Think about it like this. Over time, as you get older you reach a point where perhaps your joints aren’t what they used to be. And it’s impacting your day to day life. Your GP says you’ve got Osteoarthritis.
 
However your local GP has a ‘bank’ of stem cells. With the right stem cells injected into the joint, not only does your hip get better, but it now has the same flexibility as when you were a teenager.
 
This isn’t fanciful dreaming.
 
One relatively unknown Aussie company is working on stem cell technology that’s going to change the lives of millions. In Revolutionary Tech Investor we uncovered this amazing company and their regenerative medicine technologies back in November. Since then the stock has climbed over 70%.
 
Companies with technology like this can change people’s lives. They hold the key to improving the health of millions. And they also have the potential to completely change the financial lives of smart investors.
 
But financial glory aside, the impact of stem cell technology is turning the practice of medicine on its head. Continued advances in the use of stem cells means there’s much more to come from these wonder-cells.
 
Already research is underway for the treatment of everything from cardiac problems to orthopaedic issues and even eye and brain disease. Such is the reach of stem cells that they could be the single most important medical treatment in the history of mankind.
Posted: 2/15/2014 6:02:04 PM by Don Margolis | with 0 comments


Are you or a loved one interested in receiving stem cell treatment? For free information, please fill out our treatment form or email me don@repairstemcells.org and just put TREATMENT in the subject box and the MEDICAL CONDITION in the message.
(Extract from article by David Prentice)
Umbilical cord blood stem cells have become an extremely valuable alternative to bone marrow adult stem cell transplants, ever since cord blood stem cells were first used for patients over 25 years ago. The first umbilical cord blood stem cell transplant was performed in October 1988, for a 5-year-old child with Fanconi anemia, a serious condition where the bone marrow fails to make blood cells. That patient is currently alive and healthy, 25 years after the cord blood stem cell transplant.

Since that time, over 30,000 cord blood stem cell transplants have been done around the world, and transplants have increased for various blood and bone marrow diseases and leukemias, as well as for genetic enzymatic diseases in children. Cord blood stem cell transplants have also become more common for adults with leukemia. Cord blood transplants have been especially helpful for racial and ethnic minorities.
 
Bone marrow adult stem cell transplants require an exact match between donor and recipient, and it can sometimes be difficult to find a donor match for a patient, especially for minorities. But umbilical cord blood stem cells can be used with some mismatch and still provide successful treatments.**
 
The Wall Street Journal recently noted the increased interest in umbilical cord blood by scientists and doctors seeking stem cell cures. Besides current treatments, cord blood stem cells are now being studied for their potential to treat many more diseases, including Type 1 diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis, as well as congenital heart disease and cerebral palsy. The story quotes Dr. William Shearer, professor of pediatrics and immunology at Baylor College of Medicine:
 
“It’s a disposable item that Mother Nature provides us with… It’s a renewable source. It’s free and why not use it?”
Since the first umbilical cord blood stem cell transplant over 25 years ago, over 600,000 cord blood units have been stored away around the globe for future lifesaving transplants. Just two examples of public programs to collect and store umbilical cord blood stem cells are the National Marrow Donor Program (motto: “You could cure someone’s blood cancer by giving birth”) and the National Cord Blood Program, and additionally there are commercial cord blood storage companies, involved in collection, storage, and research. The data so far show that cord blood stem cells can be stored frozen for over 20 years without loss of potency.
 
And it’s not controversial. As a recent news story in the Washington Times showed, many more states are turning to ethical, successful adult stem cells, providing real hope and real treatments for thousands of people. One such state, Kansas, last year initiated a unique Midwest Stem Cell Therapy Center that will treat patients, do research on new therapies, educate the public and professionals on the advantages of adult stem cells such as those from cord blood and the solid umbilical cord, and train physicians to deliver those treatments. Paul Wagle was appointed by Governor Brownback to represent the patient community on the new Advisory Board for the Kansas Center. Paul received an umbilical cord blood stem cell transplant for his leukemia in 2005. Partly as a result of the successful treatment, Paul developed an interest in science and earned a triple major from Benedictine College in Kansas in 2013, and is now in seminary. The Kansas Center has already treated its first patient and held its inaugural scientific conference.

Here are just a few other examples of the double lifesaving from a born baby and the saved cord blood.

Mary Lou Rusco also received umbilical cord blood stem cells for her leukemia. She received the treatment from doctors at the Kansas University Medical Center, and is now free from leukemia.

Joe Davis, Jr. was diagnosed with sickle cell anemia, at only a few months old. His parents were told that he wouldn’t survive to be a teenager, and they couldn’t find a bone marrow match for him. But along came younger brother Isaac, whose umbilical cord blood stem cells saved Joe Junior’s life.

Chloe Levine received an innovative cord blood stem cell transplant at Duke University to treat her cerebral palsy. She’s now a happy healthy little girl.

**As accurate and meaningful as this excerpt is, it is too conservative in 2014.  Yes, in 2010 it may have been considered correct, but today, umbilical cord stem cells (UCSC) are rapidly becoming the adult stem cells of choice at our world- leading 14 clinics.  There are two reasons for this: (1) Matching UCSC, as they must for bone marrow transplants, is a waste of time. The ultra-modern, super-clean cutting-edge labs which produce them deliver a product without DNA markers.  This means that the receiving patient's immune system cannot reject them as "strange DNA."  (2) Even more exciting, is that the stem cell leaders are choosing the rare "mesenchymal" stem cells rather than the commonplace stem cells found in bone marrow, adipose, or umbilical cords because they can become virtually any kind of tissue cell the patient may need.  Since the mesenchymal numbers are something like 1/1000 of the common cells, they must be cultured and grown over time---normally 2-3 months with bone marrow and adipose, making the patient wait or make two trips to the clinic.  But the new M-UCSC are prepared and delivered to the treating doctors before the patient even arrives, meaning he now gets mesenchymals without any delay!---Repair Stem Cells Institute

Posted: 2/15/2014 5:51:44 PM by Don Margolis | with 0 comments


Are you or a loved one interested in receiving stem cell treatment? For free information, please fill out our treatment form or email me don@repairstemcells.org and just put TREATMENT in the subject box and the MEDICAL CONDITION in the message.

Stem cell therapy goes to the dogs

 

A surgical team at Veterinary Specialty Center in Buffalo Grove removes fat from Doodle, a 9-year-old German Shepherd suffering from osteoarthritis and hip dysplasia. Stem cells will be derived from the fat and injected into the dog./Photo submitted by Veterinary Specialty Center

A surgical team at Veterinary Specialty Center in Buffalo Grove removes fat from Doodle, a 9-year-old German Shepherd suffering from osteoarthritis and hip dysplasia. Stem cells will be derived from the fat and injected into the dog. Photo submitted by Veterinary Specialty Center

Doodle was the first dog to receive the new one-day stem cell procedure in Illinois./Photo submitted by Veterinary Specialty Center

Things were getting bad for Doodle. Despite her youthful name, the 9-year-old German Shepherd was experiencing joint pain from bilateral hip dysplasia and osteoarthritis. She would get sore and tired from long weekend walks and started falling up the stairs.

Her owners, the Dahl family of Oak Brook, had tried different options before landing on animal stem cell regenerative therapy, a procedure that’s a hot topic in the veterinary world. Last week, Doodle received reportedly the first such one-day operation in Illinois at the Veterinary Specialty Center in Buffalo Grove.

The practice of using stem cells, derived from the animal’s fat, to treat joint problems could be discouraging for pet owners because of cost and timing. The animal used to have to go twice to a vet hospital: once for surgery to remove fat cells and once again for the injection of the stem cells into the inflamed joint.  The cost was around $2,700.

Leslie Dahl, Doodle’s owner and a veterinarian herself, didn’t want to go that route. She had tried anti-inflammatory medication, but Doodle’s stomach couldn’t handle it. She tried collagen injections, but they didn’t fully relieve Doodle of her pain. Plus, the animal already was difficult at the vet’s and she was concerned that Doodle would get too anxious between the visits.

So when the Veterinary Specialty Center started looking into a new procedure that allows the stem cells to be processed in the same facility on the same day for about $1,900, Dahl was intrigued.

The process is essentially the same. Fat is removed and then processed by being put in a centrifuge and spun until the stoma stem cells are separated. They are then isolated, activated and injected back into the animal.

In the clinic before a lab was established, the cells were shipped to California, said Mitch Robbins, a surgeon at the Veterinary Specialty Center. The pet would be under anesthesia for removal of the cells, then a second time for the re-injection.

Doodle’s operation, and that of another dog called Fergus, were the center’s firsts in which the stem cells were processed in house, Robbins said.

He said he’s seen about 70 to 80 percent of the animals improve significantly with the treatment that’ s been available since about 2005.

“It’s been around for a little while,” said Kimberly May, a veterinarian and assistant director of professional and public affairs for the Schaumburg-based American Veterinary Medical Association. “We’ve actually been using it in horses for quite a while; now it’s being promoted for joint disease and hip dysphasia. It’s definitely growing, especially for pet owners who are hearing all these anecdotal stories.”

Research is progressing on the treatment’s effectiveness, May said.

“You find out what it really works for and where it doesn’t work,” she said. “We’re still in that stage with the stem cell procedures.”

Robbins said success depends on the animal’s ailments. Pets that don’t respond may be experiencing pain from a source other than  inflammation of the tissues around the joint.

“Some dogs do better, some do worse, some don’t respond at all,” he said.

On average, the animals he treats get re-injected every 18 months, he said. The cells can be stored, with subsequent procedures costing about $600.

Robbins believes the one-day procedure and lower cost will encourage more pet owners to help out their older dogs with arthritis or inflammatory problems. Dahl said her family would have had to euthanize Doodle if pain prevented her from moving, but that would have been a really tough decision since they embrace the dog’s quirky personality.

So far, Doodle’s recovery has been going well. It takes about 10 days to heal from the initial surgery and about four to five weeks to see results.

Doodle is still throwing balls to herself and performing stuffed animal tricks, but is not quite back to going up and down stairs.

“I don’t expect this is going to be a magic bullet to give her back her youth,” Dahl said. “But to get her where she’s not falling and she’s not in pain after going for just a moderate walk, that’s quality of life.

Stem cell therapy goes to the dogs — Buffalo Grove news, photos and events — TribLocal.com.

Posted: 4/7/2011 9:39:28 AM by Don Margolis | with 0 comments


Are you or a loved one interested in receiving stem cell treatment? For free information, please fill out our treatment form or email me don@repairstemcells.org and just put TREATMENT in the subject box and the MEDICAL CONDITION in the message.
Menstrual blood stem cell banking being launched in India
March 2011 – 12:24pm India News
 

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New Delhi : Menstrual blood stem cells can now be easily collected, processed and harvested in an affordable, painless and non-invasive manner.

This unique stem cell banking is being launched in India for the first time at Chennai, capital of Tamil Nadu state, as LifeCell Femme menstrual blood stem cell banking service.

Until now, menstrual blood was discarded as unsanitary waste. Menstrual blood contains a large number of self-renewing stem cells that multiply rapidly and can differentiate into many other types of cells such as neural, cardiac, bone, fat, cartilage and possibly others, demonstrating great potential for cell therapy, statesman reported quoting the recent research.

Every month during a woman’s menstrual period the uterine lining, endometrium, is shed along with the extra blood and tissues. This lining of the uterus contains a large number of mesenchymal stem cells and several thousand fold high concentration of stem cell growth factors. These cells from the endometrium are unique because they have many properties and characteristics similar to both bone marrow and embryonic stem cells.

Although menstrual stem cell technology has not yet been utilised to date in human therapies, the collective body of ongoing research may potentially change the types of therapies used to diagnose or treat a host of significant medical conditions in the future affecting hundreds of millions worldwide like Alzheimer’s disease, atherosclerosis, diabetes, heart disease, inflammatory bowel disease, Parkinson’s disease, osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and many others.

“Stem cell technology is the future of medicine. Experiments performed at the Keio University school of medicine have succeeded in growing sheets of heart muscle from connective tissue cells harvested from menstrual blood When it comes to growing heart muscle, however, the connective tissue cells in menstrual blood have a success rate 100 times higher than the 0.2 – 0.3 percent for stem cells taken from human bone marrow,” said the chief scientific officer, LifeCell International, Dr Ajit Kumar.

Once collected the menstrual blood stem cells are dispatched to LifeCell’s state of the art laboratory facility at Chennai for processing. The stem cells are then harvested and the menstrual stem cells are frozen in liquid nitrogen storage container for cryogenic preservation at sub-zero minus 196 degrees centigrade. This procedure will enable the stem cells to retain their potency and viability for an indefinite period of time.

Menstrual blood stem cell banking being launched in India | TwoCircles.net.

How to Donate Menstrual Blood for Stem Cell Research

By an eHow Contributor

The use of menstrual blood as a resource for stem cells has been an interesting development in the field of bioresearch. The idea of collecting stem cells has been a controversial one at times. With this new method, there is no moral dilemma for anyone involved. In the future, people will benefit from the open availability of these types of stem cells. Currently, one company has the market cornered in the collection and storage of menstrual blood for stem cells. The company is called C’Elle. Collecting and storing your menstrual blood for its stem cells is easy.

Instructions-things you’ll need:

  • Collection package
    • 1

      Order your collection kit from C’Elle through their company website (see Resources).

    • 2

      Freeze the cooling packs that arrive with your C’Elle collection kit immediately upon arrival and continuously until you are ready to package your collections and send them back via FedEx.

    • 3

      To collect your menstrual blood, insert the provided menstrual cup in place of a tampon. This cup needs to be left in for three hours to collect your first of two specimens.

    • 4

      Take the menstrual cup out. It should have about a teaspoon of fluid in it. Carefully place this fluid into the provided vials of solution.

    • 5

      Refrigerate your first specimen while you collect your second.

    • 6

      Replace your menstrual cup for another three hours and repeat the collection process for your second vial. One vial will be used for storage and the other will be used for infectious disease testing.

    • 7

      Remove your cooling packs from the freezer; the first specimen from the refrigerator and package both specimens and the cooling packs in your original collection kit box after you have collected both specimens.

    • 8

      Ship your collection kit back to C’Elle using the provided airbilled FedEx box.

Read more: How to Donate Menstrual Blood for Stem Cell Research | eHow.comhttp://www.ehow.com/how_4587255_menstrual-blood-stem-cell-research.html#ixzz1Ia5iwhot

Posted: 4/6/2011 9:43:52 AM by Don Margolis | with 0 comments


Are you or a loved one interested in receiving stem cell treatment? For free information, please fill out our treatment form or email me don@repairstemcells.org and just put TREATMENT in the subject box and the MEDICAL CONDITION in the message.
A Tauranga company is offering veterinary clinics a process for stem-cell treatment that improves healing and brightens – even lengthens – the lives of dogs, cats and horses.
 
The groundbreaking treatment is being applied to osteoarthritis, and ligament and tendon injuries affecting racehorses.
Stemvet New Zealand, established in September 2009, is committed to providing veterinarians with the knowledge and products to make stem-cell therapy an everyday treatment.

Your cherished pet is feeling the effects of old age ... it is  suffering and may need to be put down. Enter stem-cell therapy.

 
It also wants to put New Zealand veterinarians at the forefront of developments in regenerative medicine.
“The treatment certainly relieves pain and slows the ageing process,” said Stemvet co-owner Gil Sinclair.
“The degree of improvement varies with each patient. But in most cases there’s dramatic improvement in the animal’s mobility and wellbeing.”
 
Dr Sinclair, a veterinarian who has four in-vitro fertilisation (IVF) laboratories in New Zealand and Australia, has been involved with animal reproduction for nearly 30 years. He has recently worked with researchers in Sydney on the development of stem-cell extraction technology and its application in veterinary clinics.
 
His enthusiastic business partner, Kerry Hitchcock, talks about a dog suffering from osteoarthritis that was “a doormat at home”.
 
The dog had an intravenous dose of stem cells and its condition improved. In a short time it was bouncing around.
Mr Hitchcock said an inquisitive neighbour asked the dog’s owner what had happened to the dog. “The neighbour was amazed in the change to the dog,” said Mr Hitchcock.
 
Early cases treated so far have been dogs – between 8 and 14 years – severely affected with osteoarthritis, and young racehorses that have suffered tendon injuries or have osteoarthritis.
 
Fat tissue containing dormant adult stem cells is taken from the rump of horses and from under the skin of dogs, and from other animals behind their ribs.
 
Each gram of fat can contain anything from 4.5 million to 28 million stem cells. The fat is digested in a water bath at 37C, then spun in a centrifuge, and the stem cells filtered out.
 
A platelet concentrate – containing natural stem-cell activators – is extracted from a blood sample. The platelet and other solutions are mixed with the “fat-extracted” stem-cell concentrate to activate the stem cells.
 
The mixture is then exposed to a photobiostimulator which provides extra activation. The whole process takes three and a half hours.
 
The now active adult stem cells are reintroduced to the same animal, mostly by direct injection into the affected joints or tissues. Some are administered intravenously and find their way through the blood system to the inflamed area.
“We are talking about adult stem cells that can be guided into promoting health,” said Dr Sinclair. “There is a huge concentration of them in the body but they are non-functional. By taking fat out of the animals and extracting the stem cells and activating them we can improve the healing process.”
 
Stemvet has become the exclusive New Zealand distributor for Australian-based MediVet stem-cell therapy products and equipment, which includes the water bath, centrifuge, photobiostimulator and extraction kit.
 
The package, including equipment and kit, costs $15,000 and in the past month six veterinary clinics, in Christchurch, Blenheim, Wellington, Tauranga, Hamilton and Auckland, have signed up. Stemvet provides training, free of charge. Pet owners are charged about $2500 for the treatment – cheaper than the $4000 quoted by an overseas competitor.
Posted: 2/28/2011 9:40:49 AM by Don Margolis | with 0 comments


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