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Adult Stem-Cell Therapy Could Treat Radiation Sickness



The U.S. Department of Defense is working with two biotech firms to develop a treatment for radiation sickness using adult stem cells extracted from the bone marrow of healthy adult donors, New Science magazine reported.
High doses of radiation can be lethal. The experimental stem-cell therapy is intended to repair the damage, which could save U.S. military soldiers if there is a nuclear explosion or radiological attack.
"The fact that the Department of Defense is seeking to use adult stem cells as a way to treat radiation sickness demonstrates the ever-increasing benefit of adult stem cells to help patients,‚ said Dawn Vargo, associate bioethics analyst for Focus on the Family Action.
FOR MORE INFORMATION
Visit the Focus on Social Issues Web site.

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Posted: 1/22/2008 4:42:26 PM by Don Margolis | with 0 comments


Are you or a loved one interested in receiving stem cell treatment? For free information, please fill out our treatment form or email me don@repairstemcells.org and just put TREATMENT in the subject box and the MEDICAL CONDITION in the message.

Uni breaks new stem cell ground
By Phil Fleming

SCIENTISTS from Lancaster University are at the forefront of ground-breaking research into human stem cells which could hold the key to treatments for cancer and other serious diseases.
The department of biological sciences is leading an international team which has successfully located stem cells in the gastro-intestinal tract.
Research carried out at the Daresbury Laboratory near Warrington has examined the chemical fingerprints' of individual cells using an intense light facility known as the Synchrotron.
The university's Dr Frank Martin says: "This is a powerful development, building significantly on our current understanding of human stem cells, particularly on how we can locate them in the body and how they behave.
"This same technique could be now be used in other parts of the body where the location of stems cells remains unclear and has enormous potential for research into life threatening illnesses or serious injury to the body."
The full paper on this research is published in the January issue of Stem Cells.

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Posted: 1/22/2008 4:41:18 PM by Don Margolis | with 0 comments


Are you or a loved one interested in receiving stem cell treatment? For free information, please fill out our treatment form or email me don@repairstemcells.org and just put TREATMENT in the subject box and the MEDICAL CONDITION in the message.

 


Once again...to quote from ‚“STEM CELL STORY OF THE YEAR: 2007?

‚“You see, I look at embryonic stem cells from one perspective only: ‚“Does this advance in knowledge bring the treatment of incurable diseases by implanting embryonic stem cells one step closer to mankind.‚ In this case, the answer is a resounding ‚“NO!‚ ‚“


I feel the same way about this news. Much ado about (almost) nothing.



Don Margolis
Founder, SAIL NOW! Save And Improve Lives NOW!
with adult stem cells

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http://blog.wired.com/wiredscience/2008/01/stem-cell-break.html


Stem Cell Breakthrough, Sort Of


By Brandon Keim January 17, 2008 | 2:26:33

In a study published today in the journal Stem Cells, scientists made embryonic clones of two men.

Not to be a cynical, but what's the big deal?

The procedure, in which researchers from stem cell company Stemagen removed nuclei from the skin cells of two adult men and put them inside a fertilized and emptied-out egg, is already known to scientists and the public. It's the first step of cloning -- either therapeutic cloning, in which embryos provide stem cells for potential medical use, or reproductive cloning, in which embryos grow into a new person.

Both therapeutic and reproductive cloning are still in their early stages -- the latter because it's globally abhorred, the former because it's scientifically tricky. If scientists can figure out how to make viable embryonic stem cells from a clone, the human race would be a lot closer to personalized stem cell treatments, with new limbs and disease cures promised to anyone with a few spare skin flakes and enough money to foot the bill.

But this hasn't yet been done. Korean scientist Woo-Suk Hwang excited the world when he claimed to have pulled it off, but he was lying. Though Stemagen said their cloned embryos could be used to make stem cells, they didn't actually try.

On the plus side, unlike earlier cloners, Stemagen made their clones with skin cells from an adult rather than embryonic stem cells or cells from ovaries. If Stemagen's clones do turn out to be a viable source for stem cells, the procedure will be relatively practical. But that's a frontier-sized "if" -- and so long as it's unresolved, this study really doesn't deserve the sort of wall-to-wall coverage it received today.

Indeed, science journalists seem to know this. Witness the lead quote from the Associated Press story:

"I found it difficult to determine what was substantially new," said Doug Melton of the Harvard Stem Cell Institute. He said the "next big advance will be to create a human embryonic stem cell line" from cloned embryos. "This has yet to be achieved."

Melton also told The Scientist that "it would be hard to call this a major advance."

So why the coverage? Well, it's a stem cell story and there's cloning involved. Those are hot words in any season, and especially lately, with advances in other stem cell techniques (here and here) whetting public appetite for news of potentially miraculous biotechnologies. It's also hard for journalists to tell their editor, "Everyone's going to cover this, but it's not a big deal."

Neither does it help that scientists want to wash away the legacy of Woo-Suk Hwang, whose fraud jaded millions. But over-reporting an advance that could still fall short makes another disillusionment more likely.

Update: Reuters headlined their story, "U.S. company claims cloned humans and made stem cells." The lead notes that Stemagen made its clones in the "eventual hope of making matched stem cells for patients," but the writer -- who almost certainly didn't pick the headline, and thus didn't realize she'd have to correct for a false assertion -- never specifically says that stem cells weren't made.

Update Two: Rick Weiss at the Washington Post looked at this in terms of stem cells rather than cloning; from that perspective, he said, the study was significant, for it shows that few technical barriers remain to full human cloning.

Rick Weiss has long been America's chief fact-twister-in-charge for the embryonic fanatics.  Everything he ever writes on stem cells should be classified as "promotion," certainly not "news."

-Don Margolis

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Posted: 1/22/2008 4:39:57 PM by Don Margolis | with 0 comments


Are you or a loved one interested in receiving stem cell treatment? For free information, please fill out our treatment form or email me don@repairstemcells.org and just put TREATMENT in the subject box and the MEDICAL CONDITION in the message.

Ethical storm as scientist becomes first man to clone HIMSELF


By FIONA MACRAE - Last updated at 15:25pm on 18th January 2008


 


 


 


Breakthrough: Dr Samuel Wood has successfully cloned himself.

A scientist has achieved a world first... by cloning himself.

Read entire article here:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/pages/live/articles/technology/technology.html?in_article_id=508887&in_page_id=1965

xxx


Who should be cloned first? Mother Theresa? MLK Jr? Gandhi?

Why do I get the feeling that those most worthy of being cloned would be the last to do it?

And is it just me or is there a really weird resemblance between the good doctor and...

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Posted: 1/18/2008 8:39:08 PM by Don Margolis | with 0 comments


Are you or a loved one interested in receiving stem cell treatment? For free information, please fill out our treatment form or email me don@repairstemcells.org and just put TREATMENT in the subject box and the MEDICAL CONDITION in the message.

Good Morning America Features Dr. Richard Burt's Work with Autoimmune Diseases


As recently featured on Good Morning America, Northwestern Memorial Hospital researchers have found that transplanting patients with blood stem cells that originate from their own bone marrow can induce the remission of life-threatening, treatment-resistant lupus. Lupus affects an estimated 1.5 million people, mostly young females. Clinical research trials are also exploring the use of adult stem cells in other autoimmune diseases.

In a study published earlier this year in the Journal of the American Medical Association, researchers at Northwestern Memorial reported that the probability of disease-free survival at five years for patients enrolled in the lupus research trial was 50 percent.
The study, which was launched in 1997 when Dr. Burt performed the country's first stem cell transplant to treat lupus, enrolled 50 patients from 20 states and ran through January 2005.

The stem cell transplant process used by Dr. Burt and his team is similar to that done to treat some forms of cancer. The patients' own bone marrow stem cells are harvested from their blood. These cells, which can become different kinds of blood and immune system cells in the body, are then separated from the other blood cells. Next, in a process that usually requires a few weeks of hospitalization, patients immune systems are virtually destroyed through high doses of chemotherapy. Then the cleansed stem cells are returned to the bone marrow to repopulate the marrow and body in an effort to regenerate a healthier immune system.

"This is like re-booting a computer," says Dr. Burt. "The idea is that if you turn back the clock and let the immune system heal itself, the patient should have a chance of ending up without the disease."

Read the full story here:

http://www.nmh.org/nmh/mediarelations/mediaoutputs.htm?cid=1117

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Posted: 1/15/2008 8:20:21 PM by Don Margolis | with 0 comments


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