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Are you or a loved one interested in receiving stem cell treatment? For free information, please fill out our treatment form or email me don@repairstemcells.org and just put TREATMENT in the subject box and the MEDICAL CONDITION in the message.
The article, which can be found by clicking on Turn back the clock on aging muscles, is about a new adult stem cell treatment that can help restore strength to damaged skeletal muscles in the elderly. It’s not exactly the elusive “Fountain of Youth” but it’s not far from it – this new method can restore muscle function and strength to the elderly actually matching a young, healthy state.

With the ever increasing population of elderly worldwide, loss of skeletal muscle function and strength has become a significant chronic condition. It is estimated that people lose 15% of muscle mass each year after the age of 75, and up until now that loss has been irreversible and often devastating. Skeletal muscles support basic functions such as sitting, standing, blinking, and swallowing. The loss of muscle function is not easy to deal with – and many of you know exactly what I’m talking about.

Co-author of the study Assistant Professor Penney Gilbert at University of Toronto notes that during aging some stem cells experience a protein modification that impedes the growth of new stem cells. According to Gilbert, “The new method allowed the aged cells to grow and make more copies of themselves.” By transplanting these rejuvenated stem cells into injured or aged muscles tissue, they were able to return strength to levels on par with young, healthy tissue.

The new study supports what we at RSCI have been saying for years about the regenerative and restorative power of adult stem cells.” Perhaps most important is that the new stem cell treatment also has the potential to significantly shorten and improve recovery from hip replacement surgery for the elderly.

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Some of the muscles affected by hip replacement surgery which can be treated with adult stem cells.

POSTED BY "Willie"
Posted: 2/24/2014 5:46:24 PM by Miroslav | with 0 comments


Are you or a loved one interested in receiving stem cell treatment? For free information, please fill out our treatment form or email me don@repairstemcells.org and just put TREATMENT in the subject box and the MEDICAL CONDITION in the message.
Researchers have created an adult stem cell based method for restoring strength to damaged skeletal muscles in the elderly. 

Skeletal muscles are some of the most important muscles in the body, supporting functions such as sitting, standing, blinking and swallowing. In aging individuals, the function of these muscles significantly decreases.   People lose fifteen percent of muscle mass every single year after the age of 75, a trend that is irreversible.

Through tracing the signaling pathways of the cells, the researchers determined that during aging, a subpopulation of stem cells begin to express a modification of a protein that inhibits their ability to grow and make new stem cells.

"But if we instead treated those cells outside the body with a drug that prevented that protein modification from occurring, in combination with culturing the cells on something soft that is reminiscent of soft skeletal tissue, like a hydrogel biomaterial, the combination allowed the aged cells to grow and make more copies of themselves," says co-author and University of Toronto assistant professor Penney Gilbert. 

The rejuvenated cell cultures were then transplanted into injured and aged tissues, with remarkable results: the transplanted cells returned strength to the damaged and aged tissues to levels matching a young, healthy state.


University of Toronto Assistant Professor Penney Gilbert. Photo: E. Vollick

Rather than trying to 'turn back the clock' on dysfunctional stem cells in the aged population, it stimulates stem cells from old muscle tissues that are still functional - to begin dividing and self-renewing.

One of the significant challenges to elderly individuals who receive hip transplants, for instance, is the challenge of repairing skeletal muscles around the hip joint injured during surgery. The study points to the potential for future post-surgery therapies that could leave elderly hip replacement patients spry in a fraction of the time.

"It's a really new, exciting field," says Gilbert, who argues that the muscle stem cell field, which only began to isolate muscle stem cells for study within the last five years, is especially "wide open" in Toronto where "there are really impassioned clinician researchers who are interested in restoring strength in aging and disease.

POSTED by "Anne"
Posted: 2/22/2014 1:54:08 AM by Miroslav | with 0 comments


Don Margolis

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